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Information Literacy Toolkit Collection

Developed from previous library instruction sessions, Information Literacy Toolkits offer faculty the plan and resources for employing critical library pedagogy in their own classrooms. Each Toolkit provides an outline, resources, and/or suggestions to infuse information literacy concepts and skills into their curricula.

  • Alien Babies and Angelina Jolie: Evaluating Sources Using Tabloids with a Taste of News Literacy

    The following activity is meant to demonstrate the concepts of authorship and authority to first year writing students. Students will use their prior knowledge and everyday experiences with subpar information to draw parallels between evaluating academic and popular sources.



    Authorship: Understanding Authority and Scholarly Communication

    By comparing and contrasting two different sources, students will be able to understand the concepts of authorship, authority, and scholarly communication as an ongoing, evolving dialogue.



    Sugar: What is it Good For?

    This exercise will ask students to think critically about competing influences on research and policies related to the health industry and its impact on their own health choices.



    Too Good to be True: Evaluating Advertisements

    Everyday we see television commercials, online videos, newscasts, and more, many of which are meant to sway our opinions and influence our decisions, including our purchasing decisions. This exercise will introduce students to some of the techniques video producers use to influence our purchasing decisions and behaviors. 



  • Sugar: What is it Good For?

    This exercise will ask students to think critically about competing influences on research and policies related to the health industry and its impact on their own health choices.



  • Identifying and Avoiding Plagiarism

    This lesson is designed to illustrate the differences between paraphrasing, summarizing and quoting. By asking students to define and identify plagiarizing and paraphrasing, they will understand the purpose and mechanics of using sources in their writing.



    Rand Paul's Plagiarism Problem

    This exercise outline the different ways that information may be incorrectly or unethically presented to audiences and offers suggestions for correctly using information.



    Sugar: What is it Good For?

    This exercise will ask students to think critically about competing influences on research and policies related to the health industry and its impact on their own health choices.



    Too Good to be True: Evaluating Advertisements

    Everyday we see television commercials, online videos, newscasts, and more, many of which are meant to sway our opinions and influence our decisions, including our purchasing decisions. This exercise will introduce students to some of the techniques video producers use to influence our purchasing decisions and behaviors. 



  • Flawed Questions - Tools for Inquiry

    By evaluating and revising flawed research questions, students will learn strategies to formulate appropriate research questions for lower-division undergraduate essays.  



  • Authorship: Understanding Authority and Scholarly Communication

    By comparing and contrasting two different sources, students will be able to understand the concepts of authorship, authority, and scholarly communication as an ongoing, evolving dialogue.



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