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2019 Library Research Award Winners Announced

Kelly Smith, Coordinator of Collections & Discovery, with Michael Shultz

H. Michael Shultz, Jr., a History major from Sweetwater, Tennessee, received the first-place Library Research Award for Undergraduates for his paper, “The Lost Cause: The State of Franklin and the Constitution.” His research was influenced by his Tennessean heritage. Having residual knowledge of the events surrounding the State of Franklin, he was interested immediately in researching the topic thoroughly. EKU Libraries provided many assets that proved integral for the accomplishment of this paper. According to Michael, the Library staff was wonderful in assisting and guiding him through the many databases they offer, such as JSTOR, Academic Search Complete, and Dissertations and Theses Global. Dr. Brad Wood also greatly contributed by recommending he look at the Colonial and State Records of North Carolina. Sifting through these databases was a hearty, albeit enjoyable, task for a history-lover, but he says with almost absolute certainty that this paper would have never been formed in its current state without the help of the faculty and staff at EKU. 

Hannah Batsche, an Occupational Science major from Independence, Kentucky, was awarded the second-place Library Research Award. The research she did for her paper “The Effects of the Relationship Between Racism and the Environment on Personal Health,” examined whether or not there is a relationship between racism and the environment that affects the health of EKU students. She conducted a survey on campus asking both white and nonwhite students about factors of their environment and their health. The results suggested that there is a relationship between racism and the environment that negatively affects the health of nonwhite EKU students. 

Megan Hurley, a Psychology major, Spanish minor, and EKU Honors Program student from Georgetown, Kentucky, received the third-place Library Research Award. The proposal for her psychology thesis, titled “The Impact of Story Emotion and Personal History on Empathy,” outlines an experiment to analyze the effects of reading bullying vignettes. This proposes to examine the impact of the story’s level of emotion and past experiences on empathy. Megan wrote a comprehensive literature review using journal articles found through the EKU Libraries databases, which informed her hypotheses and method section.

The Library Research Award for Undergraduates is made possible through the generosity of Friends of EKU Libraries. 

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